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Little Hands

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Sarah Lotz’s formative reading experiences

Tom Kitten is the Roly- Poly Pudding

In the far, far away Midlands were the Wulfrunians live in a wicked city called Wolverhampton, in a time long before she ever thought she’d one day live Cape Town and be a genre-crossing writer of short stories, screenplays, and novels, like Pompidou Posse, and the hotly anticipated crime novel, Exhibit A, Sarah Lotz had little hands and this is what she read …

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Sarah’s earliest memory of books and reading:

My earliest memory is being shocked senseless by Beatrix Potter. Is there anything more disturbing than The Tale of Samuel Whiskers? The image of Tom Kitten being casually rolled into a roly-poly pudding by a giant rat gave me claustrophobia and nightmares well into my twenties, and I blame Ms Potter for my obsession with horror literature. I was equally terrified by Dr Seuss’s warped illustrations (still am).

Tom Kitten wriggled and squirmed until he was quite exhausted.
Presently the rats came back and set to work to make him into a dumpling. First they smeared him with butter, and then they rolled him in the dough.
“Will not the string be very indigestible, Anna Maria?” inquired Samuel Whiskers.
Anna Maria said she thought that it was of no consequence; but she wished that Tom Kitten would hold his head still, as it disarranged the pastry. She laid hold of his ears.
Tom Kitten bit and spat, and mewed and wriggled; and the rolling-pin went roly- poly, roly; roly, poly, roly. The rats each held an end.
“His tail is sticking out! You did not fetch enough dough, Anna Maria.”
[From The Roly-Poly Pudding by Beatrix Potter]

Sarah’s picture books:

Eric Carle Artwork created for cover of second edition of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, pub. 1987 Eric Carle’s The Hungry Caterpillar: Who didn’t grow up with this book? I loved it. Eric Carle - what a genius. It was only after I tried acid that I realised where he got his ideas.

Eric Carle said, “I long dreamt of a museum for children and families,” and now his dream has come true… [Visit the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art -- send Eric Carle E-cards!]

I also loved all the Richard Scarry books, and like Henrietta Rose-Innes, Lowly Worm was by far my favourite character. I recently read them to my husband’s nephews, and discovered that they’ve all been updated, toned down and made less gender specific (which made me feel strangely depressed).
Eagle Annual I was also addicted to my dad’s old Eagle Annuals. I couldn’t read the words at that age, but I was totally fascinated by the Mekon’s giant alien head.

I grew up in Wolverhampton in the Midlands, perhaps best known for being the butt of stand-up comedians’ jokes as the crappiest place in England. Fortunately, my parents loved books and my dad built his own library in our house – a large square room devoid of any natural light. My dad was and is an indiscriminate reader, and the library was packed floor to ceiling with classical literature, contemporary fiction, sci-fi and utter trash. As my parents didn’t believe in censoring my reading, I read the lot. I was hooked on the novels of Philip K Dick, Stephen King, Fay Weldon, Richard Matheson, Isaac Asimov and John Updike, but I also had a nice little earner renting out Jackie Collins novels to my classmates. Somewhere there’s a generation of middle-aged Birmingham women whose sexual identities were warped by the naughty bits in The Stud. When I moved to secondary school, Mrs Wallbank, my elderly and eccentric English teacher, introduced me to the school library, which soon became my second home – it was wood-panelled, perennially deserted and smelled of dust and sneaky cigarettes. Mrs Wallbank would terrify me by misquoting Milton and declaring that ‘books are not entirely dead’ (which stopped me drawing horses on my English set-works). She also told me that if I loved books, I’d never be lonely. It’s the best advice I’ve ever received.

Sarah, as an adult, reading with her daughter:

Falling UpI started reading to my daughter Savannah when she was three months old. Although this makes me sound like a literate and obsessive mother, it was partly selfish – I couldn’t wait to revisit Roald Dahl – and we worked our way through the whole lot. The Twits, Matilda and Revolting Rhymes were a big hit, and a story or poem every night quickly became a ritual, and continued even when she could read to herself. When she was three or so, I read her the entire The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe series, blissfully unaware that it was a thinly disguised exercise in Christian morality, and it’s telling that neither of us could get on with the po-faced Last Battle (poor old Susan). Other favourites were Shel Silverstein’s Falling Up,

“When I was a kid—12, 14, around there—I would much rather have been a good baseball player or a hit with the girls. But I couldn’t play ball, I couldn’t dance. Luckily, the girls didn’t want me; not much I could do about that. So I started to draw and to write. I was also lucky that I didn’t have anybody to copy, be impressed by. I had developed my own style; I was creating before I knew there was a Thurber, a Benchley, a Price, and a Steinberg. I never saw their work till I was around 30. By the time I got to where I was attracting girls, I was already into work, and it was more important to me. Not that I wouldn’t rather make love, but the work has become a habit.”
–(Shel Silverstein in , Publishers Weekly, February 24, 1975; Shel Silverstein’s webpage is very worth a visit.).

Michael Rosen’s Hairy Tales and Nursery Crimes and Terry Jones’s (of Monty Python fame) warped Fairy Tales. We also share an affinity for Neil Gaiman novels, Harry Potter and anything and everything by SE Hinton.

Less successful were my pre-teen favourites: Alan Garner’s The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, John Christopher’s Tripods Trilogy and Susan Hill’s The Dark is Rising. I thought they were compelling and terrifying, but Savannah (who was a feminist at age ten) was disturbed by the lack of strong female characters. And she’s never forgiven me for Black Beauty or A Little Princess – we both spent nights sobbing uncontrollably after finishing these.

—–

Voted No. 2 of 50 greatest villains in literature:

Second only to Satan, was Samuel Whiskers from The Tale of Samuel Whiskers, by Beatrix Potter
To the stark terror of generations of toddlers, this chimney-dwelling monster rat ambushes Tom Kitten and does everything in his ratty power to bake him into a roly-poly pudding and eat him. Shudder-making terror from the doyenne of anthropomorphic animal evil. [ Read on for 49 more literary villains at the Telegraph]

Roly-Poly’s Heart of Darkness: One of the most horrific stories in the history of literature?

In my case, it was with Potter that I learned that books were places of great terror. The Tale of Samuel Whiskers, or, The Roly-Poly Pudding, I present as one of the most horrific stories in the history of literature. In it, a mischievous and disobedient kitten, Tom, gets lost in the hidden places of “an old, old house, full of cupboards and passages”. He is then captured by a pair of rats, who tie him up and set about turning him into “a kitten dumpling roly-poly pudding”.
It must have been 1967 when I first had the bejesus scared out of me by this tale – and then learned the strange attraction of re-exposing oneself to this waking nightmare. Tom Kitten’s doom – wretched, bound, and lost – seemed so inevitable that the details of his rescue struck me as unconvincing. The book’s message – that fears can be instilled and insurmountable (Tom “never durst face anything bigger than – A Mouse”) – seemed, on the other hand, bleakly irrefutable. That the book was dedicated to a rat didn’t help matters in the least. [Read on at the Guardian]

The Very Hungry Caterpillar turns 40 this year

So many creeping, crawling critters appear in your work. Where did your affinity for insects come from?In my books, I honor my father by writing about nature, animals and insects. When I was a boy my father liked to take me for walks in the woods and he would lift a stone or peel back the bark of a tree and show me the living things that would scurry about.

Also in Syracuse, where I was born, my parents belonged to a nature club and we’d go on trips to the Finger Lakes with the club and stay in log cabins. I remember catching a snake on one of our outings. The snake scared the other adults, but my father explained to me that it was only a harmless garter snake. [Read more of Eric Carle's answers to 6 questions about his formative reading and writing experiences]

King of the Wonderfully Warped and Wicked! 4 BBC Interviews with Roald Dahl

Some critics have commented adversely on the preoccupation with greed, revenge and the dark side of human nature that runs through most of Dahl’s work. However, many believe it may actually be the key to his success with young readers. “I never get any protests from children,” he claimed. “All you get is giggles of mirth and squirms of delight. I know what young children like.”

The four BBC interviews cover: The importance of reading ,Childrens’ love of laughter and attraction to rudeness ,
His views on the conditioning of children and their relationship with adults , and The world he creates for his child characters

Aims of The Little Hands Trust
• To support initiatives that promote reading for enjoyment.
• To mentor African literary artists, including writers, illustrators and editors, to produce creative, suitable and appropriate children’s storybooks for children of various ages with a focus on early childhood (ages 0 to 9 years).
• To collaborate with African publishers to increase and sustain publication of children’s books in African languages. To initiate and support translations of stories between African languages, from African languages to ex-colonial languages and from ex-colonial languages to African languages.
• To help to orientate and educate adults in the importance and significance of reading to and with children.

 

Recent comments:

  • <a href="http://www.modjajibooks.co.za" rel="nofollow">Colleen</a>
    Colleen
    March 11th, 2009 @08:04 #
     
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    You're onto something re Ms Potter. My daughter can't watch the very delightfully animated version of Peter Rabbit, she finds it too terrifying. McGregor the farmer is a menacing figure - just toooo much for her.

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    March 11th, 2009 @09:14 #
     
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    I know, Colleen. Poor old Peter Rabbit. And don't ever let her watch (or read) the beautiful Charlotte's Web or My Dog Spot. Was mopping up tears for weeks after the kids saw those. On a lighter note, not sure if your daughter has discovered Barbies yet, but this is hilarious:
    http://www.cracked.com/blog/the-true-life-story-of-a-ken-doll/

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    March 11th, 2009 @09:38 #
     
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    That Ken-doll blog is utterly hilarious. Now that I think of it, my daughters' Ken-doll should definitely go and live with my son's Ninja Turtles and Bionicles. He'd have a way cooler time.

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  • <a href="http://www.moxyland.com" rel="nofollow">Lauren Beukes</a>
    Lauren Beukes
    March 11th, 2009 @10:02 #
     
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    That Samuel Whiskers story is terrifying! And it explains a lot about Ms Lotz.

    And in more Barbie news: check out the real Malibu Barbie Dream House kitted-out in celebration of her 50th birthday. http://laist.com/2009/03/10/photos_of_barbies--yes_the_doll--ne.php?gallery0Pic=2#gallery (apparently the chandelier is made from Barbie hair, which is about as disturbing as a kitten pudding)

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    March 11th, 2009 @10:05 #
     
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    Hysterical Ken-blog. Sarah, particularly like your reading history with Savannah. No wonder she is so sussed. The more I read these Little Hands blogs, the more I realise how incredibly carefully my parents filtered (censored?) everything I read as a child: no Black Beauty, no Samuel Whiskers. No Barbie or Ken either. No wonder I am such a wuss.

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    March 11th, 2009 @10:12 #
     
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    Oh my God, it's a serial killer's lair. Barbie hair chandeliers, a sunburst mirror made of 65 Barbie dolls...

    I suppose the bedsheets are made of lots and lots of sewn-together Barbie skins. Classy.

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    March 11th, 2009 @10:16 #
     
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    Eek! That mirror is particularly disturbing. I felt a pang at the waste of that incredibly lovely beachfront location. (But did you see the Barbie surfboard in the games room?)

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    March 11th, 2009 @10:38 #
     
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    And you were wondering what to give Sven for his birthday, Helen.

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    March 11th, 2009 @10:57 #
     
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    Link to A M Holmes's famously depraved barbie story. It's not for the squeamish or easily-shocked (about a boy who falls in love with his sister's abused doll):
    http://www.barcelonareview.com/eng/eng44.htm
    Last barbie-inspired link I promise.

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    March 11th, 2009 @11:05 #
     
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    I think I'll pass, being both squeamish and easily ... not shocked exactly, but upset. Still recovering from those Barbie-hair chandeliers...

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    March 11th, 2009 @11:08 #
     
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    LOL @ Fiona. Eeeeeeeeeuw, Sarah. That story is beyond depraved, but also scarily funny.

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  • <a href="http://www.modjajibooks.co.za" rel="nofollow">Colleen</a>
    Colleen
    March 11th, 2009 @11:14 #
     
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    We have read Charlotte's Web and watched the movie - several times, somehow she was OK with that. I think Ms P's story is somehow much darker.

    Love the Ken link. I often feel the same about poor Ken as I think of him. My daughter has 5 Barbies and a Ken. Barbies have a way of insinuating themselves into the lives of little girls. The first one we got is a vintage Barbie bought from Home Industries in Ladysmith on the R62, she has arms at right angles to her body as though she were Mrs Bush reaching out to greet someone or accept a bouquet of flowers from a well wisher.

    Oh God. Book SA will be the death of my working life. Loved the A.M. Homes story too and have you read "This Book will Save Your Life"?

    Bye....

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    March 11th, 2009 @11:23 #
     
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    Okay, I read it. And now I have to find some way to erase my mental hard-drive. Bleuchh.

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    March 11th, 2009 @11:29 #
     
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    @ Fiona, it was almost as bad as Louis's list of philias...remember?

    http://alexsmith.book.co.za/blog/2009/01/15/the-literary-prostitute/

    Now, why did I bring that up again? Off to scrub out my mind with soap...

    Colleen, ditto re working life. (Do you have a link for "This Book Will Save Your Life"?)

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    March 11th, 2009 @11:49 #
     
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    I'm sorry, Fiona. Maybe you should visit hayibo.com for comedic brain re-boot. Particularly liked 'SA ex-pats too busy eating rats to vote'. This, sadly, is how I'm spending my sabbatical from writing telly. Yesterday I spent half-an-hour doing all the puzzles in Heat magazine. It's disgusting. Lauren, help!
    Love all A M Holmes stuff - my favourite is 'Music for Torching'. Helen - I have 'This Book Will Save Your Life' if you wish to read it. It's a novel, not a story.

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  • <a href="http://www.moxyland.com" rel="nofollow">Lauren Beukes</a>
    Lauren Beukes
    March 11th, 2009 @12:09 #
     
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    No worries, Sarah. I'm here to help. There's this little series called The Mang...

    And I like most of AM Holmes, but she also did this incredibly disturbing book about a paedophile which was just horrible.

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  • <a href="http://tomeaton.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Tom</a>
    Tom
    March 11th, 2009 @12:23 #
     
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    Eagle! Now that's what I call a graphic novel. Am still convinced Bob Mugabe saw an Eagle Annual in his youth and, noticing his stunning resemblance to Treens, modeled himself on them. I think the Treens (and certainly the Mekon) went a bit more David Bowie in the 80s, but in the 50s they were pure Mugabe, from the half-closed eyes to that to-die-for flume that just goes on and on. I also loved Harris Tweed and that bloke in the French Foreign Legion with the fat sidekick who once distinguished himself by trying to fire pork sausages out of a Lewis gun at marauding Bedouins. Not that Eagle was into othering, of course. It taught many valuable lessons about the fat, the Arab, the Afro-alien. Mostly that they were evil. But still.

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    March 11th, 2009 @12:58 #
     
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    Just spent a glorious half-hour on hayibo. The best are the spokesperson's names: the Minister for Health in Zim is Tampax Watmiwari...

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  • alanwalters
    alanwalters
    April 2nd, 2009 @16:11 #
     
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    What,s this trash in my library Sarah ?
    Dad

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 2nd, 2009 @18:20 #
     
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    Dad - don't think I haven't seen the sneaky batch of Wilbur Smiths you've got stashed in your house. Oh yes. Now you're busted, I'm telling mom.

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 2nd, 2009 @18:24 #
     
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    AND there was a Danielle Steele in there somewhere. It's no wonder I'm a messed up kid (at age 38).

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  • <a href="http://www.moxyland.com" rel="nofollow">Lauren Beukes</a>
    Lauren Beukes
    April 3rd, 2009 @08:40 #
     
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    You know, it's bad enough our parents are on Facebook. Now they're on Book.co.za?

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @08:54 #
     
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    You can leave the nest, but the big bird is always waiting to kak on you. (Sorry, mom: ...waiting to drop a doo-doo on you.)

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  • Ben - Editor
    Ben - Editor
    April 3rd, 2009 @09:18 #
     
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    You've hit the nail on the head, Lauren. What next?

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  • ar
    ar
    April 3rd, 2009 @09:24 #
     
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    Sjoe. Next, your kids hop on at the other end.

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  • <a href="http://liesljobson.bookslive.co.za" rel="nofollow">Liesl</a>
    Liesl
    April 3rd, 2009 @09:31 #
     
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    Starting to feel like the ham in the sandwich...

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  • <a href="http://louisgreenberg.com" rel="nofollow">Louis Greenberg</a>
    Louis Greenberg
    April 3rd, 2009 @09:58 #
     
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    LOLWEAR(WIQH)

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:09 #
     
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    @ Louis - ?????

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:13 #
     
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    I've heard there are places where you can meet offline! You can say stuff to each other without anyone telling your parents or children. I've heard they even serve chips and beer. It sounds too good to be true.

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  • <a href="http://fionasnyckers.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Fiona</a>
    Fiona
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:19 #
     
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    What is this "offline" of which you speak? A new website we haven't heard of yet?

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:24 #
     
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    Yes, Richard. Where are these magical places? Not my house, as moving 3000 miles was clearly not enough to stop the crumblies from following. They now live next door. As does my 85-year-old grandmother. We're like a dysfunctional Waltons family. I can't get away with anything.

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  • <a href="http://louisgreenberg.com" rel="nofollow">Louis Greenberg</a>
    Louis Greenberg
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:26 #
     
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    @Fiona, Laugh Out Loud While Eating A Rusk (Which Is Quite Hazardous) - one of those everyday occurences.

    What's more, @Richard, if you're careful, the CIA doesn't even have a record of what you say, and it can't be held against you when you run for president. (Then again, re things being held against you when you run for president, it depends on where you're running.)

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:37 #
     
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    Ets-lay eet-may at he-tay peakeasy-say! Ook-bay ounge-lay? Frican-ay iction-fay ection-say?

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  • ar
    ar
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:42 #
     
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    Plain old ROTFL. Ok that sorts peninsularites out but what about us here in the big smoke?

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:50 #
     
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    Oo-zay Ake-lay? Ring-bay icnic-pay lanket-bay lus-pay ullet-bay roof-pay acket-jay!

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:55 #
     
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    Laughing sans rusk (now I want a rusk, damn). My dad longs for broadband, but now that I realise the true implications, I'll have to put him off. *Contemplating parents reading blog. Need to lie down.*

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  • <a href="http://louisgreenberg.com" rel="nofollow">Louis Greenberg</a>
    Louis Greenberg
    April 3rd, 2009 @10:56 #
     
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    eh-hay eh-hay ough-cay ack-hay

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @11:05 #
     
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    Atal-fay usk-ray, ouis-Lay?

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  • ar
    ar
    April 3rd, 2009 @11:27 #
     
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    ortsnay ortsnay *xpiresway*

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @12:15 #
     
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    Talking of childhood reads (which no one actually is at the moment), came across this while (ahem) doing some research on the interwebs. If you've ever read a 'Choose Your Own Adventure' book, you might appreciate it:
    http://www.cracked.com/blog/choose-your-own-adventure-on-drugs/
    NSFP

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @12:41 #
     
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    I'd need to smoke a mixed baggie of Afghanistan's finest to fully appreciate the convoluted glory of that contrivance.

    And speaking of "adventures on drugs"...

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=517198059628627413

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @13:12 #
     
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    Love the narrator's plummy British accent. Will be doing impressions of it all day. I wish I needed to be hectically stoned to appreciate contrivances, sadly my convoluted-crap radar is inbuilt.

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @13:19 #
     
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    "Within 35 minutes, the author Sarah Lotz had lost all sense of urgency and her typing skills were seriously impaired."

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @13:30 #
     
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    "...and that was BEFORE they gave her the LSD."

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @13:36 #
     
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    "It soon became apparent that she would be unable to complete the tasks at hand, as even the slightest glimmer of comedy caused her to lapse into helpless laughter."

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @13:41 #
     
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    "Fortunately she had convinced herself that she had no tasks at hand, and after quickly scoping out Ricky Gervais's blog she then spent the afternoon formulating lies as to why she has not done any work today."

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @14:01 #
     
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    If I pop a Ricky Gervais, would that be an upper or a downer?

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @14:25 #
     
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    Hmmm. Tricksy question. Possibly a downer for some. But this guy is a nice little shot of MDMA:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilNqh9Q3ep8
    But I only say that because he is Welsh. If you're rude to them, they beat you up.

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @14:53 #
     
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    Still staggering.

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  • Ben - Editor
    Ben - Editor
    April 3rd, 2009 @15:39 #
     
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    Hey, I'm Welsh. Mostly.

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    April 3rd, 2009 @18:57 #
     
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    Am running a temperature, so it seemed a good time to catch up on all these links. They make perfect sense to me, altho I could use some helpless laughter.

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  • <a href="http://sarahlotz.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Sarah Lotz</a>
    Sarah Lotz
    April 3rd, 2009 @19:15 #
     
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    My condolences, Ben.

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  • alanwalters
    alanwalters
    April 3rd, 2009 @19:54 #
     
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    Sarah , does this mean that anyone can read these blog things . The nurse in the retirement home never told me.I cant understand most of the comments anyway and promise never to disturb the peace of these crappy notes ever again.
    PS the Clint Eastwood film was great . Its wonderful to have a geriatric hero. Your mother looks at me in a new light. Dad

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  • <a href="http://richarddenooy.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Richard de Nooy</a>
    Richard de Nooy
    April 3rd, 2009 @22:00 #
     
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    I saw the Clint Eastwood movie last night, Alan. I'm actually looking forward to getting old now, even though I realise I may have limit myself to verbal abuse, because guns are banned in Amsterdam.

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  • alanwalters
    alanwalters
    April 4th, 2009 @14:36 #
     
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    Hi Richard
    My problem is that my neighbours arn't quite nasty enough for such a great ending.
    Although thinking about it , maybe just maybe, one of them is.
    Alan

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  • <a href="http://helenmoffett.book.co.za" rel="nofollow">Helen</a>
    Helen
    April 4th, 2009 @22:23 #
     
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    The Addams family comes to Noordhoek...

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